Crown of Thorns Family Project

Since tomorrow is Ash Wednesday, and my kids are all old enough now to grasp the concept, I wanted to make a Crown of Thorns to help us to observe Lent this year.  When I explained the idea to them, they all seemed eager to participate.  The plan is that each time they do a good deed during Lent, they remove a thorn from the crown.  I’m hoping it will prove a good way to get them to think about their actions a little more than they usually do.

Crown-of-Thorns-ChaosServed

The supplies for this are simple…a grapevine wreath (I found mine at the dollar store), some toothpicks, and some wood stain or ink refills to color the toothpicks. I put a few drops of Early Espresso reinker in a ziptop bag with a couple of tablespoons of rubbing alcohol, dropped in the toothpicks and made sure they were all soaking up the color, and let it sit for an hour or so.  Then I just took the toothpicks out and let them dry on a couple of layers of paper towel overnight.

Once the toothpicks were dry, all I had to do was randomly stick them into the wreath.  Ours is on a rustic wood-slice pedestal in the middle of the dining room table, so we see it everyday. I think I’ll be able to save the wreath and toothpicks to use year after year, too, so that’s a bonus!

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Easy “Egg”-cellent Teacher Gift Tag Printable

I can’t believe Easter almost here…it seems as though Lent just started (other than totally missing the eating out that we gave up for six weeks!).  Anyway, it occurred to me this morning that I need a little gift for our teachers, so I made a cute printable tag.  Then it took mere minutes to pop a few chocolate eggs (and a little Easter grass) into a kraft fry box, wrap some fabric Duck tape around it, and attach the tag (with adhesive and a cute clothespin).

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You can’t see the fun fabric tape from the front, but here’s a back/side view…I’ve been itching to use this tape, and now I feel the need to incorporate it into every project I can!

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And guess what, y’all? I posted the printable tags on Box, so you can just download, print them, and make your own cute teacher gifts. These chocolate eggs came in a giant bag from Costco (and have no “bad” ingredients) and the fry boxes were from Pick Your Plum.  The eggs would be equally as cute in a cellophane bag, of course…but then I wouldn’t have been able to use my fabric tape!

Just click on the image below to go to the download page.

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The printable has 6 tags per page, 2 with a blue background shown above and 3 with a yellow/orange watercolor background. I couldn’t decide which I liked better.

Happy Easter, if I don’t post again before then!  It’s a super busy week, what with Holy Week activities AND Princess Thundercloud’s 6th birthday on Friday.  At least I had the sense to postpone her party (her first slumber party) until next weekend, thinking that people would have way too much to do this weekend. She still expects class treats and a family celebration on the actual day, though, so I’ve been busy making a gymnastics set for her American Girl doll…I’ll post about that sometime soon! Oh, and I had a 15 page paper to write to finish up my Comp 2 class this week. Have I whined enough to be forgiven for the lack of posts? Please???

Glorious Cross Paintings…Again!

I believe this is the third year I’ve posted these photos, but it’s my favorite Easter kid craft… Glorious Cross Paintings. And it’s not even my own idea…I found it on Pinterest.  If you’d like to see the original idea, it’s at Housing a Forest.
Cross-Complete

Here’s our version.
DSC_0004-1
First, cut a piece of scrap paper in half, so it’s 5-1/2” x 8”, then cut a cross out of it, as tall as the paper is.  Color around the edges with oil pastels (put it on another piece of scrap paper).  By the way, on a totally unrelated note, Spot Shot will quickly remove oil pastels from formica.  My rainbow-loving kid did his coloring in rainbow order, but the rest of us did not.  I have to admit, his did look a little cooler.

DSC_0002-1
Everyone did well at this.  The pastel needs to be right on the edge in a fairly thick layer.

DSC_0005-1
After the edges are completely colored, lay the cross on a piece of white cardstock.  Use your finger to go all the way around, pulling the color off the cross and onto your paper.  Hold the cross firmly in place with your other hand.  The little ones needed some help with this step, but it’s a pretty forgiving craft.

DSC_0006-1
After the cross was done, we cut an arched piece of paper, colored it with shades of green along the edge, and pulled it onto the white paper to make a hill. Remember not to pull it where the cross is, so it looks like it’s behind the cross.

Cross-Drying
As a last step, we painted the sky and hill using watercolor paint. The kind the kids use at school, 8 colors in a little tray, not real watercolors an artist would use. The oil pastels resist the paint, so you don’t have to be super careful here.

We also made these on half-size pieces of cardstock, using a cross cut from a 4-1/4”x 5-1/2” piece of cardstock, and created Easter cards from them.  The kids loved this craft so much, we made them again this year. And that’s the sign of a winning craft…their enthusiasm to recreate it!

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He Is Risen Centerpiece

My sister-in-law sent me a photo a couple of years ago of a clever “empty tomb” centerpiece, and I made one for our home last year, and again this year. I love that it’s such a perfect visual for the kids to understand what the tomb looked like and how the stone was rolled away. Here’s my “how-to” from last year’s post:Tomb-Centerpiece

To make it, I used a table-top fountain I already had, since the purple pottery bowl looks amazing for an Easter table. The one my sister-in-law saw was made in a large pottery plant saucer.  I actually tried to buy one of those, but the garden centers here are still buried in snow and there’s no pottery to be found. Happily, I spied the fountain and realized it would work.

Anyway, I took the fountain parts out, leaving the bowl almost full of small river rock gravel.  I half-buried a clear plastic punch cup in the gravel and arranged large rocks from the fountain around it.  I covered the whole thing with green Spanish moss (from the floral crafts department at Walmart) to represent a hill.Tomb-Cup

Tomb-Grass

To make the crosses, one of the kids chose twigs from the yard (fortunately there were a few sticking out of the snowbanks) and I bound them together with some fancy yarn. Then we could stick them through the moss and into the gravel so they were pretty secure.

Once I figured out I could use the rocks and bowl from the fountain, this project took us about half an hour to complete.  Until I saw those rocks in the fountain, I was stymied as to how I could find appropriate rocks under the foot and a half of snow we still have in the flowerbeds.

It’s been a tremendous source of conversation as the kids see it each evening, which makes it simple to emphasize the true meaning and discussion of the events of Easter.

Speaking of Easter, here’s a little Princess Thundercloud story to brighten your day.  At Mass this weekend, during the Sign of Peace, I turned to exchange Peace with my husband first, as I always do.  Apparently she forgot that we shake the kids’ hand after that, as I heard her exclaim, “Mama, I’m tryin’ to give you your piece of the Lord!”  After she offered pieces of the Lord to all those around us, they all wished me extra peace. Heaven knows I need it!

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Magic Jellybeans

So this will be our third year planting Magic Jellybeans.  What, now?  You don’t know about Magic Jellybeans?  It’s one of those ideas I read online somewhere and filed away in the back of my mind (obviously before I had Pinterest, or I would have just pinned it).

It’s a simple idea…the night before Easter, plant some jellybeans and the next morning, giant lollipops (we use those Peeps-on-a-stick kebabs) have sprouted.  I cannot tell you how much the hooligans love this!  We even did it while staying at a hotel in Denver the first year…I saw a dude out walking his dog at oh-dark-thirty eyeing the Peeps kebobs very suspiciously, but thankfully, he steered his pet elsewhere to take care of business.

Here’s the scrapbook page I made from last year’s experience.  I made a little pillow box with a label smeared with “chocolate” (ink), put the jellybeans in it, and stuck it in our mailbox for the kids to find.  And, yes, I secretly saved the box so we can have the same delivery this year.

Jellybean-Page

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Carrot Cake Cupcakes and Gift Boxes

Another favorite from the past…delicious Carrot Cake Cupcakes and adorable boxes to hold them. We made these as teacher gifts for Easter last year, using some gift boxes from World Market and adding an insert to hold the cupcakes securely. It really didn’t take as long as you might think!
I decided to make from-scratch Carrot Cake Cupcakes so I used a recipe from my King Arthur cookbook, similar to this King Arthur Carrot Cake Cupcake Recipe.  Mine had only 2-1/2 cups shredded carrots, 8 oz crushed pineapple(drained), and 1 cup shredded coconut, but otherwise was the same. It was doggone delicious, though, so let your conscience be your guide as to whether to substitute in the ingredients I used.

Cupcake-and-Box

I found some really cute boxes at World Market that were 3”x 3”.  A package of six was $4.99.Cupcake-Box

When I bought them, I had in mind using snack mix or cookies to fill them, so when I decided on cupcakes, I realized I needed to make a cupcake holder to insert into the boxes.  It’s really quite simple.

I cut cardstock to 4-3/4” x 4-3/4” and scored it an inch in from every edge. I snipped one corner line in each corner, and cut out one side piece so I could slide my punch in far enough. CUpcake-Insert-Cut

I punched out a 2-1/2” scallop circle, then put adhesive on all the corner pieces and assembled a little stand.  I adhered the side piece I had cut out back onto the two corner pieces, too, for stability.Cupcake-Insert-ready

Then it slid right into the box, ready to have a cupcake in it!Cupcake-Insert

Cupcake-in-box

Now there’s a life skill I bet you never planned to learn today…cupcake stabilization. And don’t judge me for those giant marshmallow carrots…Thundercloud insisted we needed to add them.

Happy Easter, y’all!

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Thumbprint Cards for Easter

It’s Spring Break week here in the Land O’Chaos, so I’m going to be posting some of my favorite Easter entries from the past (with a new post or two thrown in, of course!). We made these cute thumbprint cards last year and I still love the bright colors of the paper and the fact that the thumbprint part was pure hooligans, not me.Bunny-Card

To make these, you’ll need some simple supplies:

  • Ink pad(s)…we used Daffodil Delight and Sahara Sand
  • Fine-tip markers for adding details
  • White cardstock
  • Printed scrapbook paper…I love the colors in Stampin’ Up’s International Bazaar DSP
  • Border punches…optional, but they add a bit of pizzazz!

For both cards, I cut white cardstock into 4-1/4” x 2” strips.  For the thumb-bunny cards, the kids pressed a print from their thumb for the face, then the sides of their pinkies for the ears.  I then bit my tongue and sat on my hands and allowed the eldest to add pink to the ears and nose, blue eyes, and black whiskers and mouth. Oh, and a bowtie to finish them. I drew the tie.

I cut a large egg shape from cardstock, leaving one side as a folded edge. We used that as a template to cut the card bases from 8-1/2” x 5-1/2” pieces, folded in half. We also traced the template onto the DSP and cut those, using them to completely cover the front of the card base. After punching along either side of the thumbprint piece, we punched two other borders from Rich Razzleberry and layered all that onto the DSP.

Inside I wrote “Thumb-bunnies love you!  Have a blessed Easter!”

Duck-CardWe followed all the same steps for the ducks, which were easier prints for the kids to make. Inside those cards I wrote. “Hope your Easter is happy, happy, happy!”

The kids thought these were fun to make, although they would have preferred getting as many of my stamps dirty in as many different color inks as possible, but this was something everyone could help with and still have a card that people won’t mind displaying in their homes. Hopefully.

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Homemade Peanut Butter Eggs

The hubs and I have loved peanut butter Easter eggs as long as we can remember. Until last year. We started eating more cleanly over the past eighteen months or so, and, not being huge chocolate lovers anyway, rarely had candy. When we did, we bought Unreal brand, which is so much better than standard commercial candy bars, if you haven’t tried it. Target even sells it!  But Unreal does not make peanut butter eggs, so we bought the big name ones…and didn’t like them! I remind myself that it’s a healthy thing that our tastes have changed (we don’t really like regular soda or processed foods, either), but so sad not to have our favorite treat in our Easter baskets.

Then I remembered a recipe my mom used to make for homemade peanut butter bars.  It made an entire sheet pan full, and you just put a layer of chocolate on top of the filling.  I thought it would work to shape into eggs, then cover with chocolate….and it did!

PB-Eggs-Title-ChaosServedDa

I know, they’re not as uniform and pretty as store-bought, but they really do taste much better, and the ingredients are, while not healthy, at least not harmful to you!

Peanut Butter Eggs

(makes about 18 eggs)

  • 1 cup creamy natural peanut butter
  • 2 Tbsp butter, melted
  • 1-1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 1/4 cup graham cracker crumbs (I used 2 sheets of crackers, finely smashed!)
  • 12 oz milk chocolate chips

1. Combine peanut butter and butter, and microwave for 30 seconds, just to loosen up the peanut butter.  Stir in powdered sugar and graham cracker crumbs and blend well.  It will be a really, really thick dough.  Pinch off a piece and make a ball about 1-1/2” in diameter and place on a parchment lined pan.  When all the dough is used, shape each into an egg about 1/2” thick.  Place in freezer for half an hour or so.PB-Dough

2. Melt the chocolate in the microwave according to the package directions.  It’s kind of a pain…15 seconds intervals at 50% power…but worth it to avoid burned chocolate.

3.  Using a fork (I used 2 wooden forks from store-bought salads), dip each egg, spooning chocolate over the top if needed.  Lift the egg and let excess chocolate drip back into the bowl.  Set the chocolate-covered egg back on the parchment paper and continue on dipping all the other eggs.  When finished, refrigerate or freeze until the chocolate is hardened.

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The hubs was thrilled to find these in his Easter basket!Signature

Carrot Cake Cupcakes, Cupcake Stabilization, and the Menu for the Week

On Tuesday and Thursdays, the hooligans go to Tae Kwan Do, and we arrive back home right at dinner time. Now that the time has changed, I can push dinner back a bit, but it’s still a time crunch to get dinner on the table as quickly as possible. I love to use the crockpot on those days, so that all I need to do is throw together a salad or cut up some fruit to complete the meal.

This week’s menu uses the crockpot for two of the five nights:

For the Chicken Pot Pie Soup, I substituted a cup of fatfree evaporated milk (from a can) for the half and half, and my first grader made biscuits (all by himself, except for putting in and taking out of the oven) instead of the pie crust.  It took thirty minutes from the time we arrived home from Tae Kwan Do until we sat down to dinner. I think you could probably make it in the crockpot, as well, by leaving out the two cups of water.

So since I had all these easy meals, I decided to make from-scratch Carrot Cake Cupcakes to give as teacher gifts for Easter.  I used a recipe from my King Arthur cookbook, similar to this King Arthur Carrot Cake Cupcake Recipe.  Mine had only 2-1/2 cups shredded carrots, 8 oz crushed pineapple(drained), and 1 cup shredded coconut, but otherwise was the same. It was doggone delicious, though, so let your conscience be your guide as to whether to substitute in the ingredients I used.

Cupcake-and-Box

I found some really cute boxes at World Market that were 3”x 3”.  A package of six was $4.99.Cupcake-Box

When I bought them, I had in mind using snack mix or cookies to fill them, so when I decided on cupcakes, I realized I needed to make a cupcake holder to insert into the boxes.  It’s really quite simple.

I cut cardstock to 4-3/4” x 4-3/4” and scored it an inch in from every edge. I snipped one corner line in each corner, and cut out one side piece so I could slide my punch in far enough. CUpcake-Insert-Cut

I punched out a 2-1/2” scallop circle, then put adhesive on all the corner pieces and assembled a little stand.  I adhered the side piece I had cut out back onto the two corner pieces, too, for stability.Cupcake-Insert-ready

Then it slid right into the box, ready to have a cupcake in it!Cupcake-Insert

Cupcake-in-box

Now there’s a life skill I bet you never planned to learn today…cupcake stabilization. And don’t judge me for those giant marshmallow carrots…Thundercloud insisted we needed to add them.

Happy Easter, y’all!

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Glorious Cross Paintings

On a dreary cold Palm Sunday last year, we made these Rainbow Cross pictures.  I’d like to take credit for that creativity, but if you’d like to see the original, it’s at Housing a Forest, which is a blog filled with great ideas for crafts with kids. I blogged about this last year, as well, so if it seems familiar, don’t worry. You’re not developing a mindlink with me or anything.Cross-Complete

Here’s our version.
DSC_0004-1
First, cut a piece of scrap paper in half, so it’s 5-1/2” x 8”, then cut a cross out of it, as tall as the paper is.  Color around the edges with oil pastels (put it on another piece of scrap paper).  By the way, on a totally unrelated note, Spot Shot will quickly remove oil pastels from formica.  My rainbow-loving kid did his coloring in rainbow order, but the rest of us did not.  I have to admit, his did look a little cooler.

DSC_0002-1
Everyone did well at this.  The pastel needs to be right on the edge in a fairly thick layer.

DSC_0005-1
After the edges are completely colored, lay the cross on a piece of white cardstock.  Use your finger to go all the way around, pulling the color off the cross and onto your paper.  Hold the cross firmly in place with your other hand.  The little ones needed some help with this step, but it’s a pretty forgiving craft.

DSC_0006-1
After the cross was done, we cut an arched piece of paper, colored it with shades of green along the edge, and pulled it onto the white paper to make a hill. Remember not to pull it where the cross is, so it looks like it’s behind the cross.

Cross-Drying
As a last step, we painted the sky and hill using watercolor paint. The kind the kids use at school, 8 colors in a little tray, not real watercolors an artist would use. The oil pastels resist the paint, so you don’t have to be super careful here.

We also made these on half-size pieces of cardstock, using a cross cut from a 4-1/4”x 5-1/2” piece of cardstock, and created Easter cards from them.  The kids loved this craft so much, we made them again this year. And that’s the sign of a winning craft…their enthusiasm to recreate it!

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